Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember.Involve me and I learn.

    —Benjamin Franklin

Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember.Involve me and I learn.

    —Benjamin Franklin

Meet Kat

Kat Janowicz, author of Chasing Zero (due out in 2021 from Rare Bird Books), is a “big picture” thinker who is redefining sustainability. She cares deeply about the environment and uses her expertise in strategic business planning, transformative technologies, energy and transportation to advance policies and practices that make the world healthier for people and industry to thrive.

More Kat

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

– Margaret Mead
THE QUEST FOR CLEAN AIR

Chasing Zero

Chasing Zero examines the power of communities to reduce pollution, reshape industries and influence global politics.

Author Kat Janowicz, president of 3COTECH and a leading environmental and business strategist in energy, transportation, technology, infrastructure and international trade, focuses on the “Think Globally, Act Locally” story and remarkable transformation of Southern California’s busiest ports. She traces the history of the ports’ environmental reformation, the challenges of eliminating pollution from international trade, the promise and realities of technology, and the roles local government, the private sector, communities, and residents have played in the process.

Chasing Zero book cover
THE QUEST FOR CLEAN AIR

Chasing Zero

Chasing Zero examines the power of communities to reduce pollution, reshape industries and influence global politics.

Author Kat Janowicz, president of 3COTECH and a leading environmental and business strategist in energy, transportation, technology, infrastructure and international trade, focuses on the “Think Globally, Act Locally” story and remarkable transformation of Southern California’s busiest ports. She traces the history of the ports’ environmental reformation, the challenges of eliminating pollution from international trade, the promise and realities of technology, and the roles local government, the private sector, communities, and residents have played in the process.

Two Decades of Going Green

Legend:     Global impact      State regulated     Community impact    Ports’ initiatives

Two Decades of Going Green

Legend: Global impact State regulated Community impact Ports’ initiatives

Two Decades of Going Green

Legend: Global impact State regulated Community impact Ports’ initiatives

Zeroing in on Zero

MAKING INNOVATION WORK FOR EVERYONE

Evolving Technology

Computers, mobile phones and the internet are essential to everyday life. Technology also drives business. But not all solutions are fully developed or commercially available, especially when it comes to powering vehicles, equipment and vessels to deliver goods to market. Also, while new technology creates new jobs, increased efficiency often eliminates existing ones. How can technology work for everyone?

TRANSITIONING TO CLEAN ENERGY

Modernizing Infrastructure

Bridges, roadways, terminals and other critical infrastructure need to be built and maintained. Electric vehicles need to recharge, ships that run on liquefied natural gas need to refuel, as does equipment powered by hydrogen fuel cells. Nothing and no one moves without infrastructure. Building it requires money, materials and a trained, highly skilled workforce. How do we accelerate the capital projects to ensure capacity and clean energy?

PAYING FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

Funding Innovation

It is said an engineer with an unlimited budget can build anything. But budgets are limited and technology and infrastructure have hefty price tags. Support infrastructure alone can be just as costly as the technology it’s meant to service. In a highly competitive world whose inhabitants include some who still question the reality of climate change, what resources can we cobble together to pay for a sustainable future and how do we use those resources wisely?

PAYING FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

Funding Innovation

It is said an engineer with an unlimited budget can build anything. But budgets are limited and technology and infrastructure have hefty price tags. Support infrastructure alone can be just as costly as the technology it’s meant to service. In a highly competitive world whose inhabitants include some who still question the reality of climate change, what resources can we cobble together to pay for a sustainable future and how do we use those resources wisely?